Category Archives: BIOMATERIALS

UNIVERSITY LECTURE NOTES ON TOPICS OF BIOMATERIALS (CONTINUED………….)

  • Lecture 1: Molecular Design and Synthesis of Biomaterials I: Biodegradable Solid Polymeric Materials (PDF – 1.6 MB) Polyanhydride Deg Rates (XLS)
  • Lecture 2: Molecular Design and Synthesis of Biomaterials I: Biodegradable Materials (PDF)
  • Molecular Design and Synthesis of Biomaterials I: Biodegradable Solid Polymeric Materials (continued) (PDF)
  • Lecture 3: Degradable Materials with Biological Recognition (PDF – 1.5 MB)
  • Lecture 4: Degradable Materials with Biological Recognition (part II) (PDF)
  • Lecture 5: Controlled Release Devices (PDF)
  • Lecture 6: Programmed / Pulsed Drug Delivery and Drug Delivery in Tissue Engineering (PDF – 1.3 MB)

Call for Abstracts-23rd European Conference on Biomaterials, the Annual Conference of the European Society for Biomaterials, September 11 – 15, 2010

TOPICS FOR PAPERS:

CNS = Central Nervous System
CVS = Cardio Vascular System
CMF = Cranio-Maxillo Facial
ENT = Ear, Nose and Throat

Dates & Deadlines:

Deadline for oral presentations January 25th, 2010
Deadline for poster presentations March 15th, 2010
Notification of acceptance and mode of presentation (oral or poster) or rejection of abstracts in week 17 (end of April).

BIOMATERIALS PAPERS

Chemically crosslinkable thermosensitive

polyphosphazene gels as injectable materials

for biomedical applications

FULL PAPER:

DOWNLOAD HERE

SUMMARY:

DOWNLOAD HERE

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FIGHT CANCER GO EASY

Scientists from University of Strathclyde have devised a novel way to harness natural vitamin E extract that would kill tumours within 10 days.

Using a new delivery system, the research team could mobilise an extract from Vitamin E, known ton have anti-cancer properties, to attack cancerous cells.

In the study conducted over skin cancer, the researchers found that tumours started to shrink within 24 hours and almost vanished in ten days.

They believe the tumours might have been completely destroyed if the tests had continued for longer.

When the tumours regrew, they did so at a far slower rate than previously.