Category Archives: BIOMEDICAL DEVICES

Implant to detect heart attack

EPFL scientists have developed a tiny, portable personal blood testing laboratory that sends data through mobile phone network. This is a tiny device that can analyse the concentration of these substances in the blood. Implanted just beneath the skin, it can detect up to five proteins and organic acids simultaneously, and then transmit the results directly to a doctor’s computer. This method will allow a much more personalized level of care than traditional blood tests can provide. Health care providers will be better able to monitor patients, particularly those with chronic illness or those undergoing chemotherapy. The prototype, still in the experimental stages, has demonstrated that it can reliably detect several commonly traced substances.

Lecture Notes on Biomedical Instrumentation and Design

Course Objectives:

 

Students will be able to apply the principles of electronic circuits and devices to the use and design of instrumentation in the biomedical area. They will have gained a basic knowledge of the operating principles of electrical and other transducers, analog and digital instrumentation, applied signal acquisition and processing, electrical safety in the medical environment, electrical properties of nerve and muscle physiology; and instrumentation used in cardiopulmonary, neurological, surgical, and rehabilitation areas of medicine.

 

Lecture 1 – Introduction

 

Lecture 2 – Sensor Models

 

Biomedical Project Ideas: Visualization tool for Myocardial Strain Tensors

The heart is a complex three-dimensional structure with mechanical properties that are inhomogeneous, non-linear, time-variant and anisotropic. These properties affect major physiological factors within the heart, such as the pumping performance of the ventricles, the oxygen demand in the tissue and the distribution of coronary blood flow.

During the cardiac cycle the heart muscle tissue is deformed as a consequence of the active contraction of the muscle fibers and their relaxation respectively. A mapping of this deformation would give increased understanding of the mechanical properties of the heart. The deformation induces strain and stress in the tissue which are both mechanical properties and can be described with a mathematical tensor object.

Biomedical Projects: Modeling of the arterial system with an Artificial Vasculature Device Implanted

The number of patients that are waiting for heart transplants far exceed the number of available donor hearts. Left Ventricular Assist Devices are mechanical alternatives that can help and are helping several patients. They work by taking blood from the left ventricle and ejecting that blood into the aorta.

In the University of Louisville they are developing a similar device that will take the blood from the aorta instead of the ventricle. This new device is called an Artificial Vasculature Device. In this project the arterial system and AVD are modeled and a simple control algorithm for the AVD proposed.

6 Innovative Digital Health Products

A recap of 6 innovative digital health products that dominated CES 2013 held in conjunction with the Digital Health Summit.

The declaration by many predicting 2013 as the “year of digital health” got even more evidence to back up their claims with digital health making a huge splash at last week’s annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. The Digital Health Summit, which is held in conjunction with CES featured some of the most innovative digital health products available and soon to be available in the market.

How to Prevent Medical Device Hacking?

Author: Ashish Malik
M.Tech (Information Security & Computer Forensics)
Email: ashishmalik10@gmail.com, ashishmalik10@yahoo.com

A heart defibrillator remotely controlled by a villainous hacker to trigger a fatal heart attack? Yes now its possible, The Government Offices have released a report warning that medical devices are vulnerable to hacking and calling for greater oversight of such devices.

The investigation into electronic medical-device safety was initiated after computer-security researchers found dangerous vulnerabilities in insulin pumps. “Even the human body is vulnerable to attack from computer hackers,” Representative Anna Eshoo, a Democrat from California, said in a statement on her website. Preventing potential hacking it might seem as simple as requiring a password for access. The operating systems that hospitals use are an even bigger challenge.