Tag Archives: University of California Los Angeles

Biomechanics of Rat Ovarian cells Charactercized

Researchers characterize biomechanics of ovarian cells in mice according to their phenotype at early, intermediate, and late-aggressive stages of cancer

Using ovarian surface epithelial cells from mice, researchers from Virginia Tech have released findings from a study that they believe will help in cancer risk assessment, cancer diagnosis, and treatment efficiency in a technical journal:Nanomedicine.

By studying the viscoelastic properties of the ovarian cells of mice, they were able to identify differences between early stages of ovarian cancer and more advanced and aggressive phenotypes.


To understand the root of the problem of these latter diseases, visualizing brain activity is key. But even the best imaging devices available — fMRIs and PET scans — can only give a “coarse” picture of brain activity.

UCLA neuroscientists have now collaborated with physicists to develop a non-invasive, ultra–high-speed microscope that can record in real time the firing of thousands of individual neurons in the brain as they communicate, or miscommunicate, with each other.

“In our view, this is the world’s fastest two-photon excitation microscope for three-dimensional imaging in vivo,” said UCLA physics professor Katsushi Arisaka, who designed the new optical imaging system with UCLA assistant professor of neurology and neurobiology Dr. Carlos Portera-Cailliau and colleagues.




Location:Los Angeles, CA

Type:Assistant Professor

Expires:January 21, 2011

Job description

Faculty Position at UCLA, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior

The Semel Institute and the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA are seeking a tenure track faculty member at the Assistant or Associate Professor rank to assume a leadership role in a program of cognitive neuroscience on nonhuman primates in the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience of the Institute. The candidate should be proficient in the creative use of methods of primate behavioral neurophysiology and should have a record of accomplishment using those methods, with evidence of the ability to attract public or private research support. Given the interdisciplinary nature of progress in cognitive neuroscience, and given the rich interdisciplinary environment of UCLA, it is expected that the candidate will be conversant with the latest advances in allied fields and ready to collaborate with colleagues in those fields. The candidate will be expected to participate creatively in interdepartmental teaching programs on cognitive neuroscience.