Tag Archives: BRAIN

Research Positions in Neuroscience

The Neuroelectromagnetic Oscillations (NEMO) Lab, directed by Sarang Dalal and recently relocated to Aarhus University (Denmark), is recruiting postdocs and PhD students for a large ERC-funded project.

The ERC project will examine in detail how neural oscillations communicate information between the retina and cerebral cortex in humans, during presentation of various types of visual stimuli as well as during rest. This will involve several recording techniques, primarily magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroretinography (ERG), with some components involving scalp EEG, intracranial EEG in epilepsy patients, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).

Brain Impant can restore memories

article 2321081 19AC1584000005DC 540 634x539 e1368470975488 Brain implants may restore human memory in the near future

Hippocampus, the part of the brain with a major role in forming long-term memories

A memory device may be implanted in a small number of human volunteers within two years and the device might become available to anyone within five to ten years. A maverick neuroscientist, Theodore Berger, believes he has deciphered the code by which the brain forms long-term memories.

Theodore Berger, a biomedical engineer and neuroscientist at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, envisions a day in the not too distant future when a patient with severe memory loss can get help from an electronic implant.

Brain Machine Interface Muscle control bypassing Spinal Cord

paralysed monkey bypass spinal cord brain machine Bypassing Spinal Cord, New Brain Computer Interface Sends Signals Directly from Brain to Muscles


Medical researchers have successfully enabled a paralyzed monkey to move its hand, by delivering messages from the brain directly to the muscles, completely bypassing the spinal cord. This is a breakthrough for spinal-cord injuries, it opens doors to future brain implants that could restore movement in paralysed limbs.

A new Northwestern Medicine brain-machine technology delivers messages from the brain directly to the muscles – bypassing the spinal cord – to enable voluntary and complex movement of a paralyzed hand. The device could eventually be tested on, and perhaps aid, paralyzed patients.

Neural Imaging Research

Neural imaging—maps of brain functions—is a primary tool used by researchers hoping to transform the lives of people living with chronic neurological conditions such as epilepsy. At present, researchers often require several different imaging techniques to fully map brain functions, making research and treatment of these conditions expensive and inefficient.

Using cutting-edge illumination technology, Professor Ofer Levi and his research students from the Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) and The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE) has developed a new cost-effective neural imaging system. It allows researchers to make much more complex maps of the brain with just one camera and one imaging system. The team’s initial findings, released this week inBiomedical Optics Express, demonstrate that this new technology may one day transform the way researchers view the human brain.

Imaging Sensors to study the Inner workings of Brain

Alan Jasanoff is designing imaging sensors that could help reveal the brain’s inner workings.


After finishing his PhD in molecular biophysics, Alan Jasanoff decided to veer away from that field and try looking into some of the biggest questions in neuroscience: How do we perceive things? What happens in our brains when we make decisions?

After a few months, however, he realized that he didn’t have the tools he wanted to use — so he decided to start making his own.