Category Archives: Biomedical Technology

Interactive Workshop on “Medical Device Safety Guidelines” at Chandigarh

Dear Sir/Madam,

 

NABH is happy to announce Interactive Workshop on “Medical Device Safety Guidelines” at Chandigarh on 20th June 2015, in the series of NABH knowledge workshops.

 

This workshop introduces best practice guidelines for use and maintenance of medical devices, including selection, management, and assessment. In a time where healthcare technologies particularly the medical devices are finding an important and vital role in healthcare delivery, unsafe practices could not only defy the very purpose of their use but also create hazardous situations. Hence it is important to provide good management, maintenance and assessment eco-systems to the medical equipment. This workshop aims to provide the relevant knowledge to the participants.

Implant to detect heart attack

EPFL scientists have developed a tiny, portable personal blood testing laboratory that sends data through mobile phone network. This is a tiny device that can analyse the concentration of these substances in the blood. Implanted just beneath the skin, it can detect up to five proteins and organic acids simultaneously, and then transmit the results directly to a doctor’s computer. This method will allow a much more personalized level of care than traditional blood tests can provide. Health care providers will be better able to monitor patients, particularly those with chronic illness or those undergoing chemotherapy. The prototype, still in the experimental stages, has demonstrated that it can reliably detect several commonly traced substances.

Wireless Medical Monitors, Transforming Healthcare delivery

It’s hard to find a better example of how technology is revolutionizing patient care than the tiny edible sensor Proteus Biomedical of Redwood City plans to begin selling this fall in the United Kingdom.

When the grain-of-sand-size sensor is integrated into a drug tablet or capsule and activated by stomach fluid, it signals when the medicine was taken to a patch on the patient’s body. Then the patch relays the information along with the person’s heart rate and other medical details to a caregiver’s phone — all without a visit to the doctor.